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Laptop “Your device ran into ….. Auto. repair could not repair….”

Laptop "Your device ran into ..... Auto. repair could not repair...."

Laptop “Your device ran into ….. Auto. repair could not repair….”

Hi, this is a fix for the “pending update”, we have tested this and it does work, read carefully, before proceeding.

 

Too large for attachment so the code on this forum deos not allow for images (sorry nothing I can do about that , I will not use an upload site, should not prevent you from running the fix.)

 

 

This is an altered fix from a tech net blog, unfortunately it was far from user friendly.

We need to access the RE (recovery environment), a certain way to do this is to start your computer, wait until windows attempts to load and then press and hold the shutdown button, to force shutdown. You do this, two or three times and windows realizes, there is a problem, it will boot to the RE.

If you are able to boot to windows then you can access the RE by going to shutdown and selecting restart, press and hold the shift key whilst clicking on “restart”. You can also access the RE from within windows go to PC settings, under Update & Security, select Advanced Startup, then “Restart Now”, will boot to the RE.

If you have created a recovery disk (and everybody should) you can change BIOS boot order and boot from it, straight to the RE. Using a OS image, (from MS) setting BIOS to boot from it selecting “repair your computer”, also opens the RE

 

Once in the RE, you select “Troubleshoot” then “Advanced” and then “Command Prompt”

 

Once into the RE and having opened a cmd prompt, we need to move to the directory that the RE has assigned to the OS (in the RE windows OS is not always assigned to the C: drive)

 

NOTE:- all cmds have to be typed as shown here (syntax is important, and inc “ where shown)

 

At the prompt type:-  bcdedit | find “osdevice” (press enter, the | is called a pipe and can be found above the key)

The cmd will return osdevice…partition X (where x is a drive letter, we use this letter in the following cmd’s, typically in windows ten this letter will be D:, we assume D:, if not change to what the cmd returns.

 

At the cmd prompt type:- D: (press enter), the prompt will now be D:>

 

Microsoft Support advises to get rid of the SessionsPending, reg key. Let’s load the software registry hive:

At the D:> prompt type:-

reg load hklmtemp d:windowssystem32configsoftware (press enter)

 

Delete the SessionsPending registry key (if it exists):

At the D:> prompt type:-

reg delete “HKLMtempMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionComponent Based ServicingSessionsPending” /v Exclusive (press enter)

 

 

Note:- the screen shots are as a  general guide, the X:windowssystem 32 will actually be D:>

 

 

UPDATE: We saw a few cases where the above reg delete failed, (you will not see a success message) in that case , do this:- (note:- this is only necessary if the proceeding command does not return a success message, if you cannot find “Exclusive” do not worry, it will not impact, just move on)

 

At the D:> prompt type:-

 Regedit (press enter)

 

Registry editor will open navigate to:-

HKLMtempMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionComponent Based ServicingSessionsPending

In the right payne locate the entry “Exclusive”, right click on it and select delete, don’t worry after a restart windows will recreate the key

 

 

 

 

 

Next we need to Unload the software registry hive:

At the D:> prompt type:-

reg unload HKLMtemp (press enter)

 

 

Now lets pullout with DISM.exe the list of installed packages

At the D:> prompt type:-

dism /image:D: /get-packages > 0 & notepad 0 (press enter)

Will open in notepad (makes copy paste easier) below is a sample output, it will have quite a few entries:-

Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool

Version: 10.0.16299.15

Image Version: 10.0.16299.334

The scratch directory size might be insufficient to perform this operation. This can cause unexpected behavior.

Use the /ScratchDir option to point to a folder with sufficient scratch space. The recommended size is at least 1024 MB.

 

Packages listing:

 

Package Identity : Package_for_KB4054022~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~16299.96.1.7

State : Installed

Release Type : Update

Install Time : 01/12/2017 00:27

 

Package Identity : Package_for_KB4056887~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~10.0.1.0

State : Installed

Release Type : Security Update

Install Time : 10/01/2018 03:41

 

Package Identity : Package_for_KB4058702~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~16299.188.1.0

State : Installed

Release Type : Update

Install Time : 08/01/2018 04:07

 

Package Identity : Package_for_KB4074595~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~10.0.1.0

State : Installed

Release Type : Security Update

Install Time : 20/02/2018 01:12

 

Package Identity : Package_for_KB4087256~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~16299.245.1.0

State : Installed

Release Type : Update

Install Time : 20/02/2018 01:14

 

Package Identity : Package_for_KB4088785~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~10.0.1.0

State : Installed

Release Type : Security Update

Install Time : 14/03/2018 01:53

 

Package Identity : Package_for_KB4090914~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~16299.251.1.0

State : Installed

Release Type : Update

Install Time : 06/03/2018 07:29

 

Package Identity : Package_for_RollupFix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~16299.248.1.17

State : Superseded

Release Type : Security Update

Install Time : 06/03/2018 07:43

 

Package Identity : Package_for_RollupFix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~16299.251.1.4

State : Superseded

Release Type : Update

Install Time : 14/03/2018 01:57

 

Package Identity : Package_for_RollupFix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~16299.309.1.3

State : Superseded

Release Type : Security Update

Install Time : 14/03/2018 02:39

 

Package Identity : Package_for_RollupFix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~16299.334.1.4

State : Installed

Release Type : Update

Install Time : 23/03/2018 04:27

 

The operation completed successfully.

 

 

Checkout the ones which are:- State: “Install Pending”, It may also say “Staged” , “Superseded” or “Absent”, if it is “Installed” all is fine, as one of those was causing the issues (highly likely the last entry in your list)

 

Have a good look at the output of the above cmd we need to use the data against the line in the cmd that say’s “Package Identity”, if you go to the top of the cmd window you will see the cmd prompt name in the header and a small Icon, if you right click here, you get a menu, choose “Edit” and then “mark” you can then highlight the line against “Package Indentity”, right click anywhere in the highlighted text and it is copied to the clipboard. You can right click, and paste the Package Identity into the remove cmd coming up.

 

Before we can remove them we need to create a temporary directory first to where we can move the updates to:-

 

At the D:> prompt type:-

 

MKDIR D:temppackages (press enter)

Now let’s (re)move the “pending” package(s) with the DISM command

 

At the D:> prompt type:-

 

dism /image:d: /remove-package /packagename:PACKAGEIDENTITYNAME /scratchdir:d:temppackages (press enter)

 

Note:- PACKAGEIDENTITYNAME is where you paste the data from the previous cmd, there are no spaces between the PackageIdentityName and the : you see in the cmd, an example will look like what you see below

 

Be focused on the output of the command and if it completes successfully, be patient it can take a few minutes and appear to hang, just wait, it will finish.

 

 

 

Type:- Exit and restart your computer hopefully the errant update will have gone.

 

We have found that if you now run:-  dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth,

Then run sfc/scannow

before checking windows updates the errant update will now install.

 

 

 

 

 

 EXTRA INFO:-

 

You can make this easier for yourself, I have created a simple txt file (opens in notepad) , this is only possible if you can access windows, if so:-

 

Copy and paste the details into your notepad, save it to your desktop, call it Updatefix.txt.

 

When you are in the RE command prompt you can change to the OS drive letter, (bcdedit osdevice cmd), then before doing anything else at the D:> prompt type:-

 

Notepad (press enter)

 

Notepad will open from the main menu select “File” then “open”, browse to your desktop and open the Updtefix.txt file, You can use it to copy and paste the cmds into the cmd prompt, just minimise it between cmd copies.

 

You will find when you copy any cmd and right click in the cmd prompt window the cmd will automatically append to the prompt (no need to paste). This is useful for copying the “PackageIdentyName” into the cmd in notepad then copying it into the cmd prompt.

 

Note if the OS is on a different drive (we have used D: in this example) substitute whatever the bcdedit cmd returns for D:

 

 

Copy these cmd’s into notepad:-

 

Bcdedit |find “osdevice”

 

reg load hklmtemp d:windowssystem32configsoftware

 

reg delete “HKLMtempMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionComponent Based ServicingSessionsPending” /v Exclusive

 

Regedit (only if the above cmd errors)

 

reg unload HKLMtemp

 

dism /image:D: /get-packages

 

MKDIR D:temppackages

 

dism /image:d: /remove-package /packagename:PACKAGEIDENTITYNAME /scratchdir:d:temppackages (see below)

 

 ( use “mark’ to copy the package identity, and then paste it into this cmd (spaces important)

 

 it is a bit complicated print it out and maybe get a experienced user to help implement it. It does work we use it often.

Edited by jenae, Yesterday, 06:25 PM.

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